‘This keeps us going’ by Arjana Blazic

Arjana Blazic’s latest blog post is titled “This keeps us going”.

Arjana says, “Last night Sonja and I led the first in this year’s series of webinars for senior students. This is the fourth year in a row that we organize webinars aimed at students to help them with their exit exams. We had special guests from the Ministry of Education, the National Centre for External Evaluation of Education, the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, the Agency for Science and Higher Education and the Open University Algebra.”

This keeps us going

Arjana Blazic’s Blog

 

‘The familiar /iː/ and /ɪ/ and the mysterious /i/ How many do we need?’ by Adrian Underhill

Adrian Underhill’s latest blog post is titled “The familiar /iː/ and /ɪ/ and the mysterious /i/ How many do we need?”.

Adrian says, “In the 70′s and 80′s learner dictionaries general subsumed /i/ under /ɪ/ thereby stating that the sound at the end of happy is phonemically part of the allophone set of /ɪ/. Personally I think that is a reasonable decision for teachers and learners, and indeed I still cannot myself reliably hear a distinction between the sound at the end of happy and /ɪ/.”

The familiar /iː/ and /ɪ/ and the mysterious /i/ How many do we need?

Adrian Underhill’s Blog

BBC Article: ‘Developing pronunciation through songs’

BBC TeachingEnglish team has posted an article titled, ‘Developing pronunciation through songs’

Like us, you might already use songs in class, and find that your students enjoy them. But have you considered choosing songs specifically to work on pronunciation?

Songs provide examples of authentic, memorable and rhythmic language. They can be motivating for students keen to repeatedly listen to and imitate their musical heroes. Here, we look at some aspects of pronunciation that can be focused on through songs.

Download ‘Developing pronunciation through songs’ Article.

BBC Article: ‘Creating a class play’

BBC TeachingEnglish team has posted an article titled, ‘Creating a class play’

In this article a teacher reflects on his experiences of creating plays and using them to help motivate students to develop their English.

Download ‘Creating a class play’ Article.

Worksheet: ‘Prague’s Witches’ Night Festival – Reading Activity’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled, ‘Prague’s Witches’ Night Festival – Reading Activity’

This is a reading activity that I have prepared for my pre-intermediate students. It contains two pages: the first one has a semi-authentic article from The Guardian (I have made a few changes in the text so as to render it more suitable to the level) that describes a peculiar night festival in Prague; the last one has two reading comprehension exercises and a question for pairwork discussion. I hope you enjoy it! =)

Download ‘Prague’s Witches’ Night Festival – Reading Activity’ Worksheet

Worksheet: ‘Compound Words – Spring Theme’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled, ‘Compound Words – Spring Theme’

A compound word is made up of two words that come together to make one new word. The words included on this worksheet are all associated with spring. Students are asked to draw a line from each word on the left to the word on the right so that they form a compound word. This worksheet was created by PrimaryLeap.co.uk

Download ‘Compound Words – Spring Theme’ Worksheet

Worksheet: ‘200 English Proverbs, Sayings, Idioms, Conversational Clichés ( Hungarian and Ukrainian)’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled, ‘200 English Proverbs, Sayings, Idioms, Conversational Clichés ( Hungarian and Ukrainian)’

200 English proverbs, sayings, idioms, conversational clichés and phrases and their reflections in Ukrainian and Hungarian. Here we can see the difference between the translations and how the English proverbs, sayings, idioms, conversational clichés and phrases are reflected in Ukrainian and Hungarian. We have already learnt that we can’t translate word-for-word and the observation of these expressions also corroborate this fact. But we can use them in teaching and get acquainted with different cultures by them.

Download ‘200 English Proverbs, Sayings, Idioms, Conversational Clichés ( Hungarian and Ukrainian)’ Worksheet

Worksheet: ‘Superheroes Possessive Presentation’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled, ‘Superheroes Possessive Presentation’

This is a presentation presenting objects or parts of superheroes, the students are shown how to use ‘whose’ and possessive form (‘s). The first part is a vocabulary recap about superheroes parts or objects. It’s quite simpe and repetitive for quite young learners.

Download ‘Superheroes Possessive Presentation’ Worksheet

Worksheet: ‘The British Royals’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled, ‘The British Royals’

This worksheet is about the British Royal Family from Elizabeth II to Prince George. Pupils have to read and answer questions about the members of the Royal Family. There’s also a guessing game. Then pupils can create a game for their classmates, write a question or a riddle, swap their exercise books and try to answer their classmates’ questions and riddles.

Download ‘The British Royals’ Worksheet

Worksheet: ‘City vs Countryside PPP’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled, ‘City vs Countryside PPP’

My presentation was inspired by this one: ttp://busyteacher.org/18191-country-and-town-powerpoint.html I’ve only edited the pictures (so, they have no those lines from online picture stores) and added some tasks. Instead of just reading sentences about city and the countryside they have to think of missing words in them. I’ve inserted icons to help them come up with their variants. This presentation can be used as a warm-up discussion at the beginning of a lesson for elementary students.

Download ‘City vs Countryside PPP’ Worksheet

‘Unlock Learning with Ollie Bray’ by Arjana Blazic

Arjana Blazic’s  latest blog post is titled “Unlock Learning with Ollie Bray”.

Arjana says, “Ollie gives lots of practical information on what teachers, school administrators and policy makers need to take into consideration if they want to deploy a 1:1 learning environment. I highly recommend this book, even if you don’t have any plans for using 1:1 computing whatsoever. Because it’s learning and teaching that this great e-Book is about. Or as Ollie says, “Adding technology doesn’t mean more learning and adding technology to a boring lesson may not make a lesson more interesting.”

Unlock Learning with Ollie Bray

Arjana Blazic’s Blog

 

 

 

 

’10 tips for creating a class agreement…’ by Edna Sackson

Edna Sackson’s latest blog post is titled “10 tips for creating a class agreement…”.

Edna says, “Do a quick google image search for ‘classroom rules’ and ‘classroom agreements’ (or ‘essential agreements’ as they’re called in the PYP) and see if anything surprises you.What I noticed is that, despite the heading, many classroom agreements are still lists of rules.”

10 tips for creating a class agreement…

Edna Sackson’s Blog

 

‘Activities for Practicing Listening and Speaking Skills’ by Richard Byrne

Richard Byrne’s latest blog post is titled “Activities for Practicing Listening and Speaking Skills”.

Richard says, “The BBC’s Skillswise website offers lots of good activities for learning and practicing skills in language arts and mathematics. A section of the site that could be useful in a lot of classrooms is the speaking and listening section. The speaking and listening section contains subsections offering lessons and activities to develop a specific skill. Those skills are listening for specifics, communication skills, formal and informal speaking, and giving presentations. Each section has a short introductory video followed by a set of quizzes and interactive games in which students test their skills.”

Activities for Practicing Listening and Speaking Skills

Richard Byrne’s Blog

 

‘Incubus: a film in Esperanto with William Shatner’ by Stan Carey

Stan Carey’s latest blog post is titled “Incubus: a film in Esperanto with William Shatner”.

Stan says, “On a walk in Galway once I met a Polish couple poring over a map. We were going the same way, and fell into step. They were in town for anEsperanto conference, and when the man – an Esperanto playwright – learned I had an interest in languages, he eagerly gave me a crash course in its grammar as we manoeuvred the uneven paths and busy streets.”

Incubus: a film in Esperanto with William Shatner

Stan Carey’s Blog

 

 

 

‘New Newsletter Option – The Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week’ by Richard Byrne

Richard Byrne’s latest blog post is titled “New Newsletter Option – The Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week”.

Richard says, “Beginning today you can sign up for my new newsletter,The Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week. Along with an idea for making your technology integration experience better, the seven most popular posts of the week on Free Technology for Teachers will be included in the email. The email will go out on Sunday night/ Monday morning depending upon your timezone. If you prefer to see the posts directly rather than through email, they will be posted onPracticalEdTech.com.”

New Newsletter Option – The Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week

Richard Byrne’s Blog

 

‘Keep up with Twitter conversations with Conweets’ by Lisa Nielsen

Lisa Nielsen’s latest blog post is titled “Keep up with Twitter conversations with Conweets”.

Lisa says, “Have you ever wanted to recall what you Tweeted with someone else or have an easy way to know what two tweeps have been tweeting about to each other? Some of you may have used Bettween for this, but unfortunately, they have ceased operations. Fortunately, Conweets has jumped in to do just that! Simply sign in via Twitter, enter the handles of two users and Conweets will display conversations.”

Keep up with Twitter conversations with Conweets

Lisa Nielsen’s Blog

 

‘Something in Common 2: Practice with compound words’ by Jennifer Lebedev

Jennifer Lebedev’s latest blog post is titled “Something in Common 2: Practice with compound words”.

Jennifer says, “Compound words are definitely an example of the kind of language that sends people to the dictionary. In my seventh lesson in theEnglish Writing Skills playlist, I address the complications of punctuating compound nouns and compound modifiers. My basic advice is to consult a trusted dictionary when there’s doubt, and when dictionaries don’t agree, then just choose a pattern and be consistent. For instance, day care will be understood just the same as daycare, but day-care would likely be seen by most as an error.”

Something in Common 2: Practice with compound words

Jennifer Lebedev’s Blog

‘Looking back and forward…’ by Edna Sackson

Edna Sackson’s latest blog post is titled “Looking back and forward…”.

Edna says, “Goals need to be specific, focused, achievable and include a plan of action. Ask me what my goals are for next year, I feel pressured to come up with something that fits those criteria, and I can’t think of anything to say.I’m more of an inquiry kind of person. I love learning and exploring, making connections, going off on tangents, finding and solving problems, experimenting with ideas and possibilities, questioning and innovating.”

Looking back and forward…

Edna Sackson’s Blog