Worksheet: ‘Gerunds & Infinitives’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled ‘Gerunds & Infinitives’

This worksheet is very helpful for the students to practise the usage of gerunds & infinitives. There are all together 20 questions in the worksheet. The students need to fill in the spaces with either the infinitive or the gerund form of the verb in brackets.

Download ‘Gerunds & Infinitives’ Worksheet

Worksheet: ‘Money Crossword’

The BusyTeacher team has published a new worksheet titled ‘Money Crossword’

I couldn’t find a suitable crossword related to money vocabulary so I made one myself. Hope it is helpful. I use it mostly with my pre-ints and they take up quite some time to complete it as some of them maybe challenging. Would also suggest to use it with intermediates.

Download ‘Money Crossword’  Worksheet

‘Motivating Language Learners’ Martin Sketchley

Martin Sketchley’s latest blog post is titled “Motivating Language Learners”.

Martin says, “A fewweeks ago, I decided to write up a post about drills in the classroom but I find myself deciding to write a topic which I have experienced first hand: motivating learners.  Last month, I wrote about dealing with the Intermediate Plateau as part of an ELTChat Summary and came across some wonderful ideas.”

Motivating Language Learners

Martin Sketchley’s Blog

‘C is for Contrafibularities, Context, Co-text and Big Blue Wobbly Things’ by Chris Ożóg

Chris Ozog’s latest blog post is titled “C is for Contrafibularities, Context, Co-text and Big Blue Wobbly Things”.

Chris says, “So, why wouldI be sharing this with you? The reason is to talk about how you make sense of it. After all, the humour is based on, among other things, some excellent neologisms, so there’s a lot going on when you process what Blackadder says (for the purposes of this post, let’s pretend there was no video and this is an extract from a reading lesson).”

C is for Contrafibularities, Context, Co-text and Big Blue Wobbly Things

Chris Ożóg’s Blog

‘Regionally “Corrupted” Names’ by Ben Trawick-Smith

Ben Trawicl-Smith’s latest blog post is titled “Regionally “Corrupted” Names”.

Ben says, “The Lacks were a poor African-American family from a remote corner of southern Virginia. Although I’m not certain, I believe “hyse” references the Canadian-raising-type pronunciation of that word common in older “Tidewater” accents.”

Regionally “Corrupted” Names

Ben Trawick-Smith’s Blog

‘Shapers of the Language 7: The Technocrats’ by Barrie England

Barrie England’s latest blog post is titled “Shapers of the Language 7: The Technocrats”.

Barrie says, “It’s abig jump from Samuel Johnson to the digital age, and the likes of Alan Turing (1912-1954), Tim Berners-Lee (1955-), Bill Gates (1955-) and Steve Jobs (1955-2011), and there have been those in between who have exerted considerable influence on the language.”

Shapers of the Language 7: The Technocrats

Barrie England’s Blog